RL Glossary

Back Rolling
The rolling or laying-off of a paint that has been sprayed on to a surface.

Bail
Metal loop or ring forming a handle.

Ball
Round turning used as foot on chests, chiefly on 17th-century furniture. Same as bun foot in England.

Balloon
Chair back style developed by Hepplewhite, extensively used in Victorian work.

Baluster
A turned, supporting column, generally slender, used as a pillar.

Banding
A narrow edging or border of veneer around the fronts of drawers; a contrasting band of inlay.

Banquette
An upholstered bench or settee.

Baroque
(Italian equivalent of French “rococo”) Irregularly shaped, overly fantastic design. Used as a general term to denote a style of furniture common in the early 18th century. The word comes from a 15th century Italian architect who was called Barrochio.

Barrel
Easy chair with a fully rounded back, developed in England after the “gondola” of the Louis XV period.

Bead
Half-round molding, usually small.

Beam.
The point at which fabric bolts of the same pattern are sewn together to facilitate continuous rotary printing. Beams may appear within bolts. Allowances are always made for beamed bolt shipments.

Bell
Ornamental detail, carved or painted, resembling bell-shaped flowers arranged vertically.

Bergere
Upholstered French armchair with closed upholstered sides.

Bevel
A sloping edge, of various angles, applied to any material – wood, glass, metal, etc. Similar to chamfer.

Binder
Film-forming ingredient in paint that binds the pigment particles together.

Bleaching
The process of restoring discolored or stained wood to its normal color or making it lighter.

Bleeding
Undercoat staining through the topcoat.

Blistering
The formation of bubbles or pimples on the painted surface caused by moisture in the wood, but painting before the previous coat has died thoroughly, or by excessive heat or grease under the paint.

Block
A chest composed of a concave center panel flanked by two convex panels.

Blushing
A gloss film turning flat or clear lacquer turning white, usually caused by moisture condensation during the drying process.

Body
The thickness or thinness of a liquid paint.

Bolt
Unit of packaging in fabric or wallpaper.

Bombe
(French) An outward swelling, applied to commodes, bureaus, chest, armoires. Typical of late 17th century, early 18th century English design.

Bonnet
An unbroken pediment or top section of a highboy, secretary, and the like.

Booking.
A step during the pasting stage of a wallpaper installation. Procedure entails the folding of wallcovering strips paste surface to paste surface to assure ease of handling and time for the material to relax.

Boucle
French word for curled. Indicates a curled nap, with loops, for a rough appearance.

Boulle
Celebrated designer of the Louis XIV period noted for his inlay of metals and tortoise shell. “Boullework” is a descriptive phrase.

Bowfront
A front that curves outward to appear convex; characteristic of 18th century work.

Boxing
Mixing paint by pouring from one container to another several times to ensure thorough mixing.

Boxwood
(Florida) Tough hard textured wood. Because of its peculiar yellow color it is often used for inlays.

Bracket
Low foot on case goods. Runs both ways from corner, forming a right angle.

Breakfront
A bookcase or cabinet in which a center section projects forward from the two end sections.

Breathe
The ability of a paint film to permit the passage of moisture vapor without causing blistering, cracking or peeling.

Bristle
The working part of the brush containing natural bristle (usually hog hair) or artificial bristle (nylon or polyester).

Brocade
Originally heavy silk with elaborate pattern in silver or gold threads. Brocade has an embossed appearance.

Brocatel
A variation of brocade; heavy fabric, chiefly silk, woven usually in large patterns that appear to be embossed.

Broken
Pediment of any shape that is interrupted at the apex.

Brush Marks
Marks of brush that remain in the dried paint film.

Brushability
The ability or ease with which paint can be brushed.

Brushed
Twill fabric in which brushing or other process is used to raise the nap of the fabric's surface thereby giving it soft hand.

Bubbles
Air bubbles in a drying paint film caused by excessive brushing during application or by over vigorous mixing that results in air entrapment.

Buffet
A small cupboard, sideboard, dining room dresser of almost any description used as a receptacle for articles not immediately wanted at the table.

Build (or film build)
The thickness a paint tends to build when using normal application techniques.

Bullion
Fringe of heavy twisted cords. Originally these had metal strands.

Bun
A flattened ball, or bun shape, with a slender ankle above.

Burl
A tree knot or protruding growth which shows beautifully patterned grains when sliced. Used for inlay or veneer.

Burnishing
Shiny or lustrous spots on a paint surface caused by rubbing.